Upcoming Courses
Diploma: Non Profit Workshop
September, 2015, California
Local Partner: Pitzer College
Guided Field Data Collection—3 Weeks
Live Training Workshop—1 Week

CSDi Training Programs:
Enroll by September 1
Community Based Adaptation
September 1 - October 26
Integrated CBA & DRR
September 1 - October 26
Designing & Funding Non Profit Projects
September 1 - October 26
Food Security & Home Gardens
September 1 - October 26
Water Conservation & Mgmt.
September 1 - October 26
Climate Smart Agriculture
September 1 - October 26
Community Based DRR
September 1 - October 26
Blended Distance and Live Training
September 1 - October 26
Mentor with Tim Magee
September 1 2015 - March 2 2016
CSDi 100 Day Coaching Program
September 1 - December 1 2015

Course Catalogue

Cursos en Español

270 Student Project Activities

e earning courses: Enroll Now Button

What our students are saying:

This Month's News
Join 15,000 subscribers

July 2015: Can you identify? Nonprofit Interviews
• Challenges, Solutions & Funding Plans
• Organization and Program Management
• Funding
• Staffing and Volunteers

100 Projects: The Best of 3 Years of Partner Field Projects

CSDi Newsletter: Subscribe Now ButtonVisit the Newsletter Library

CSDi Blog
News and commentary on results-based development
Newsletter Library
Wednesday
Oct172012

CBA Climate Change News: Lesotho | St. Lucia | Mozambique | Tanzania | Grenada | GEF Grant | Fiji | CBA Resources

October, 2012 CBA Climate Change News
Lesotho | St. Lucia | Mozambique | Tanzania | Grenada | GEF Grant | Fiji | CBA Resources

THIS MONTH'S NEWS
The theme of this month's newsletter has a special focus on climate smart agriculture for smallholder farmers. This was why we launched our online course—Climate Smart Agriculture—to address the fact that so many course participant's projects have a basis in challenges with agriculture for subsistence farmers.
Tanzania
Adaptation Through Conservation Agriculture
Chris Enns (Canada), has been working for the past 18 months on a project in the community of Wagete in the Region of Mara, Tanzania. 4,000 community members are suffering from reduced crop yields due to unpredictable weather patterns related to climate change.

Chris decided to launch a farmer soil and water conservation program, and in August led a very comprehensive conservation agriculture workshop. You can link to a report of the workshop complete with detailed photographs of the conservation agriculture techniques they used.
 
Saint Lucia
Adaptation, Agriculture and Livelihoods
Brenda Wilson (Saint Lucia), has been working for the past four months on a project in the community of La Pointe, Micoud, St. Lucia. 25 households are suffering from low incomes from reduced crop production due to changes in weather patterns bringing extreme weather events such as hurricanes, and an increasingly unpredictable beginning and end to rainy season.
 
Brenda developed this project outline to increase crop production, reduce malnutrition and improve food security among children and the community. Download Brenda's compelling two-page fact sheet.
 
 
Mozambique Finding Climate Smart Agricultural Solutions to Famine
Phipps Campira (Mozambique), Zipo Akinyi (Kenya/New Zealand), and Lenneke Knoop (The Netherlands) have been working for the past two months on a project in the community of Mezimbite, Mozambique. 566 households (3,400 people) are frequently suffering from famine caused by a lack of knowledge of improved agricultural practices and climate change related unpredictable rain and extreme weather events.
 
The team developed this project outline to increase crop production, reduce malnutrition,  improve food security, and reduce mortality rates among children and the community. Download their scientific research on project activity effectiveness.
 
 Kingdom of Lesotho
Climate Change and Poor Harvests
Mapale Matsela (Lesotho), Tavatya Joseph Madzvamuse (Uganda), and Nana Lupyani (Zambia) have been working for the past two months on a project in Mpharane, Lesotho. 40% of the population live below the poverty line of US $1.25 a day. 1,800 members of four villages in Mpharane are facing poor harvests due to climate change related unpredictable start of rainy season, unusual dry periods, and extreme weather events/floods.
 
The team developed this project outline to be able to enjoy improved nutrition and year-round food security food security through a climate smart agricultural practices program. Download their full project outline.
 Grenada
Drought and Flooding: Dual Challenges
Gillian Primus (Grenada), Hanna Bartel (Canada), and Meredith Waters (US) have been working for the past year on a project on the island of Grenada; Grenada has been hit by a series of tropical hurricanes and tropical storms exhibiting increased ferocity over the past seven years. This has led to reduced crop harvests, a reduction in food security, increased malnutrition, and increased poverty.
 
The team originally developed this project outline to increase crop production, and are now looking for highly specific sub activities to target highly specific in-field challenges—such as drought and flood.
 Fiji
Loraini Sivo  Wins $40K GEF Grant Award for Project Developed in Online Course
In 2011 Loraini Sivo (Fiji) and Fatema Rajabali (UK) developed a project with a community of people in a village called Yadua. Read a description of the problem the community members faced based upon participatory needs assessment—and about their  solution-oriented project design.
 
Says Loraini: "The course OL 341 helped me develop a concept for Yadua on a small scale ecosystem-based adaptation climate change project which was then submitted to GEF Small Grants. After a few consultation meetings with GEF, they informed me that they were willing to fund the project."
Project Resources Best of October Online Resources for CBA Development Practitioners
FAO.  This document looks at 171 scientific studies that analyze the impact of utilizing the types of techniques that we've been studying in our CSA course.
Routledge has announced the publication date for the New Earthscan book by Tim Magee—A Field Guide to Community Based Adaptation: December 17.
3. 7th International Community Based Adaptation Conference
18th to 25th April, 2013. Dhaka, Bangladesh. Share the latest developments in mainstreaming community based adaptation into international, national and local planning and processes.
 
We've trained development professionals from over 425 organizations in 140 countries to develop projects impacting over 260,000 people.
BECOME THE SOLUTION. Are you a donor, development practitioner, in transition, or a student who wants to learn more about "what works" in development? Join students world-wide to design, fund and launch a community based project. Student projects have utilized 215 different kinds of solution-oriented activities to address community need. Scan the list to see which would work best for your project.
 
Be sure to visit CSDi’s Development Community. Join 700 colleagues in sharing resources & collaborating online.
Like us: CSDi Facebook.
Learn more about design and implementing CBA projects.
 
Would you like to subscribe to this newsletter?
 
The Center for Sustainable Development specializes in providing sound, evidence-based information, tools and training for humanitarian development professionals worldwide. CSDi is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.
 
Wednesday
Oct172012

Tanzania: Adaptation through Conservation Agriculture

Chris Enns (Canada), has been working for the past four months on a project in the community of Wagete in the Region of Mara, Tanzania. 4000 community members are suffering from and reduced crop yield due to unpredictable weather patterns related to climate change.

These challenges reduce children's ability to receive a sound education, leading to a reduction in their ability to develop and prosper as adults. These challenges also reduce the ability of adults to lead the productive, meaningful, prosperous and hopeful lives they need to leave the cycle of poverty and contribute to the development of their communities.

Participatory Needs Assessment

Chris decided to a farmer soil and water conservation program. And in August led a very comprehensive conservation agriculture workshop. You can link to a report of the workshop complete with detailed photographs of the conservation agriculture techniques they used.

Chris's simple project outline:

[Problem 3] Reduced crop yield
Farmer Soil and Water Conservation Program
[Solution to underlying cause: unpredictable rainfall patterns have reduced crop yield]  
[Activity 1] Farmer workshop on soil and water conservation techniques
[Activity 2] Mulching for increasing organic material in the soil

Farmer Extension Program [Solution to underlying causes: Unpredictable/late start to rainy season; mid-season drought/early end to rainy season, and increased temperatures have reduced crop harvests.]:
[Activity 1]. Participatory mapping and identification of local crop and buffering challenges
[Activity 2]. Farmer workshop and follow-up on early maturing and/or drought resistant crops/varieties for adapting to climate variability, as well as cash crops that could have a profitable harvest in times of heavier rain.  
[Activity 3]. Farmer workshop and follow-up on buffering against the late arrival of rain and/or an early end to the rainy season

Conservation Agriculture:

"Conservation agriculture aims to conserve, improve and make more efficient use of natural resources through integrated management of available soil, water and biological resources combined with external inputs. It contributes to environmental conservation as well is to enhanced and sustained agricultural production.

Conservation agriculture incorporates three key elements:
1. Minimal tillage of the land; tilling the soil disrupts soil microorganisms and soil fauna which provide important functions and healthy soil system
2. Protecting the surface of the soil with a permanent or semi-permanent organic soil cover: mulch, leave crop residues in place—and no burning of crop residues. This organic material breaks down and provides organic material for the soil and provides a substrate for and feeds soil flora and fauna. It also increases soil moisture in reduces erosion.
3. Crop rotation; helps to avoid disease and pest problems

Conservation agriculture includes minimal tillage, mulching, and crop rotation—but it can also include softening and enriching of the soil that is specific to individual plants. For example, one technique leaves a farm field intact, but digs small planting basins 30 cm in diameter (or a rectangle 30 cm long depending on your source), 20 cm deep, and 60 cm - 75cm apart. Nutrients such as lime, compost and manure are added back into the hole, the seeds planted, and then covered by soft soil high enough to cover the seeds but low enough to leave a depression were the planting basin is. This depression collects rainwater and let's it percolate into the soil for future use in arid regions; this might not be the best idea for areas of high rainfall. The planting basins are then mulched to protect the soil from exposure to sun (to keep soil temperatures down in hot regions), and to protect the soil from wind and rain (to reduce soil erosion and runoff— a loss of valuable rainwater).

Crops are regularly rotated to reduce depletion of valuable nutrients through hungry crops such as corn, and to prevent disease and insects taking over a permanent habitat.

You can download Chris's full project outline here:
OL 343 Assignment 5

You can download Chris's report of the conservation agriculture workshop -- complete with great photographs here:
OL 344 Assignment Four.

Would you like to learn how to to develop Community Based Adaptation Projects?

What's happening in the region where you live?
Please write us with your stories, thoughts and comments through Online.Learning@csd-i.org or post them at our Facebook Page, or on the Center’s Blog.
 
Be sure to visit CSDi’s Development Community. Join 700 colleagues in sharing resources & collaborating online.

 
Like us: CSDi Facebook.
 
I look forward to hearing from you.
 
Sincerely,
 
Tim Magee, Executive Director
 
Would you like to subscribe to this newsletter?
 
The Center for Sustainable Development specializes in providing sound, evidence-based information, tools and training for humanitarian development professionals worldwide. CSDi is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.
 
Wednesday
Oct172012

St. Lucia: Adaptation, Agriculture and Livelihoods

Brenda Wilson (Saint Lucia), has been working for the past four months on a project in the community of La Pointe, Micoud, St. Lucia. 25 households are low income from crops and produce due to changes in the weather patterns bringing extreme weather events such as hurricanes, and an increasingly unpredictable beginning and end to rainy season.

These challenges affect the organization and its members in their active involvement in developing successful agri-business to meet the needs of families and the wider community. This inhibits their ability to obtain more secure land tenure and the development of the organization to make a more significant contribution in alleviating situations of hardship encountered by the community, increasing awareness of the benefits of agri-business as well, as well as the impact of poor environmental practices on the community.

Participatory Needs Assessment

After conducting a participatory needs assessment with the community members of La Pointe, Brenda developed this project outline to increase crop production, reduce malnutrition and improve food security and reduced mortality rates among children and the community.

Their simple project outline:

[Problem 1] Low income from crops and produce
Advocacy Program for Government Market development Support
[solution to underlying cause: Bureaucracy associated with market access; engaging in group activities that are not seen as beneficial to obtaining markets]
[Activity 1]. Facilitate the organization of a community Advocacy Program committee
[Activity 2]. Consultation with advocacy expert to develop a participatory process and committee training program
[Activity 3]. Advocacy Program committee develops an advocacy plan in order to work together with the authorities on assistance in identifying and gaining access to markets.
[Activity 4]. Advocacy program: Make an official claim to the Ministry of Agriculture and akin agencies asking to include on the budget assistance to Superior Broom Producers and Latanye Farmers in identifying and gaining access to markets

Climate Smart Agricultural Practices Programme  [solution to underlying cause: changes in the weather patterns springing  extreme weather events such as hurricanes, and an increasingly unpredictable beginning  and end to the rainy season]:[Activity 1]: Surveys and interviews to collect traditional knowledge on agriculture, changes in agricultural cycles, vulnerabilities and coping strategies
[Activity 2]: Identify expert specialist/extension agent in soil, water and agriculture to design and facilitate participatory workshops
[Activity 3]. Community workshop on participatory mapping of water and land resources and uses, agricultural challenges and vulnerabilities—and  degraded hotspots
[Activity 4]. Extension agent visits most affected farmers to identify exact CC impacts to crop production and needs of farmers to adapt to the impacts (diseases, droughts and floods and other adverse events)
[Activity 5]: Develop plan that combines resilient and improved agricultural techniques with traditional knowledge for an overall improvement in productivity
[Activity 6]: Establish pilot plots demonstrating better cultivation practices
[Activity 7]: Conduct Farmer workshops on soil restoration and conservation techniques
[Activity 8]: Conduct Farmer workshops on water conservation and management techniques
[Activity 9]. Workshops on crop diversification and drought resistant crops.

Project Goals:

Brenda's project goals are to let the community members of La Pointe be able to enjoy obtain improved incomes from greater market access for products and produce and through a climate smart agricultural practices program aimed at reducing the impacts of changes in weather patterns.

These solutions will enhance the development of the organization and its members in their active involvement by developing successful agri-business to meet the needs of families and the wider community, provide opportunities to obtain more secure land tenure, improve the capacity of the organization to contribute significantly towards alleviating situations of hardship encountered by the community, increase public awareness of the benefits of agri-business as well as having positive impact on good environmental practices within the community.

You can download the participatory needs assessment with photos for her project here:
OL 341 Assignment One.

You can download her full project outline here:
OL 341 Assignment Two.

You can download Brenda's compelling two-page fact sheet here:
OL 342 Assignment Five.

Would you like to learn how to to develop Community Based Adaptation Projects?

What's happening in the region where you live?
Please write us with your stories, thoughts and comments through Online.Learning@csd-i.org or post them at our Facebook Page, or on the Center’s Blog.
 
Be sure to visit CSDi’s Development Community. Join 700 colleagues in sharing resources & collaborating online.

 
Like us: CSDi Facebook.
 
I look forward to hearing from you.
 
Sincerely,
 
Tim Magee, Executive Director
 
Would you like to subscribe to this newsletter?
 
The Center for Sustainable Development specializes in providing sound, evidence-based information, tools and training for humanitarian development professionals worldwide. CSDi is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.